Pest Problems in Autumn and Winter Weather

Pest Problems in Autumn and Winter Weather




It’s getting late in the year, it’s cold outside and we’re hiding inside for warmth. And we’re not the only ones. Bugs and pests are more freely associated with the warmer weather of spring and summer, but it’s when it gets cold that many of the problems begin. Mice, rats and already some insects need to stay warm and your nice, snug, centrally heated house is just the sort of place to find it.

rodents infestations increase dramatically during the autumn and winter months, and contrary to popular belief they can occur in both towns and countryside. Rats and mice are attracted to supplies of food as much as warmth and the great quantities of rubbish found in cities such as London average there is plenty on offer for them there. To that end, a simple way to decline the chances of infestation is to make sure your rubbish isn’t left out for too long or else is kept in a obtain bin. If not, the rats will find it, start breeding and you may very quickly find a rodent infestation on your hands.

Rats and mice have a sense of smell many times as strong as a human’s. Like many mammals, smells and scents are vital to their survival, as they use their urine to mark out territory, objects and paths. One can deter rodents by laying down strong smells. Mothballs are a shared and effective option, though the strong odor can also end up being unpleasant for we humans in addition. consequently it’s a solution best appropriate to out-of-the way areas that are liable to infestation, such as attics, cellars and sheds or already caravans and campers which might be left uninhabited over the winter.

Wasps are commonly a summer problem, but the recent warm weather method that many wasps are staying active much longer than is usual. Those nests which keep outside are doubtful to survive the first frost, but those inside – hidden away in attics, garden sheds or barns – can survive into late October and early November. The new queen will typically have left the nest at the end of the summer, but those wasps left behind will continue to look for food. Like many of us, they can end up getting a bit tipsy as Christmas draws near, as often the only food obtainable is decaying fruit that has begun to ferment. Unfortunately, many wasps are also at their most dangerous at this time of year; as the hunt for food becomes ever more difficult, the insects will become increasingly aggressive. As with rodents you can minimize your chances of attracting wasps by not leaving food out for longer than is necessary. If there are only a few wasps about, a trap may be sufficient to deal with them, but the best tactic is to simply wait for them to fly away.

Winter brings its own problems when it comes to pests, but to be informed is to be prepared. There are small, preventative measures you can take to ward off pest infestations, but be aware that tackling an established colony head on is a problem best left to the professionals. And remember, it might not just be you who’s keeping warm in your house this winter.




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