Leaving the Scene of an Accident in Florida

Leaving the Scene of an Accident in Florida




Car accidents can be stressful and overwhelming. When a person is involved in a crash, he or she may panic and not know what to do next. In some situations, drivers may leave the scene of an accident. Although it may seem minor, leaving the site of a crash could average criminal charges with harsh consequences.

In Florida, it is a criminal act to leave the scene of an auto accident, which is commonly known as a “hit and run.” Drivers are required to keep where the crash happened or in a safe place near the site to ensure those involved receive the medical attention necessary and that all information is obtainable to promptly probe the incident.

According to Florida Statute Section §316.062, the driver of a means involved in a crash resulting in character damage, injury or death must provide information necessary for an insurance claim. This information could include:

• The driver’s name

• The driver’s address

• means registration number

• Driver’s license number

After a crash, the drivers involved should stop without obstructing traffic more than is necessary. for example, if two drivers are involved in a minor rear-end accident or a fender bender accident, pulling over to the shoulder or to a nearby parking lot would be permissible.

If a severely damaged means is obstructing traffic and it is not considered drivable, the driver of such means must make every reasonable effort to move the means or have it moved so as not to obstruct the regular flow of traffic, according to Florida Statute Section §316.027(3).

If a crash results in character damage and the driver of one of the vehicles involved leave the scene, he or she could confront criminal charges. If an occupied means or any other attended character is damaged, he or she could be charged with a second-degree misdemeanor. This could include up to six months in jail, $500 in fines or both, according to Florida Statute Section §316.062.

However, if a driver leaves the scene of an accident where an injury occurred, the charges and the associated penalties could be much greater. If a driver involved in an accident suspects another person in the crash suffered a bodily injury, he or she must stop at the scene or in a safe, nearby location. He or she also must keep at the scene until aid is rendered.

Leaving the scene of an accident with bodily injury in Florida is considered a third-degree felony, according to Florida Statute Section § 316.027(2).This is punishable by up to five years in prison, a $5,000 fine or both. Additionally, this could average having a criminal record and a felony conviction.

As with a minor injury, if a person involved in a crash suffers a serious bodily injury, other drivers involved in the accident are expected to stop. If a person leaves the scene of an accident that results in serious bodily injury, he or she could confront second-degree felony charges, punishable by up to 15 years in prison, a fine up to $10,000 or both.

If a person is killed at the scene of an accident and a driver involved in the crash leaves, he or she could confront some of the harshest penalties for a Florida traffic offense. According to Florida Statute Section §316.027(2)(c), this could be considered a first-degree felony.

A conviction for this first-degree felony offense could average a mandatory minimum term of four years in prison. The person, however, nevertheless would confront up to 30 years in prison, a fine of up to $10,000 or both. If the driver was intoxicated at the time of the crash, he or she also could confront a four-year mandatory sentencing.

Additionally, drivers could be ordered to pay restitution to victims for the damages or injuries involved in the crashes. Drivers also could confront having their licenses revoked for at the minimum three years. They also could be required to attend a department-approved driver improvement course relating to the rights of unprotected road users relative to vehicles on the roadway.




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